Scalise, Cassidy and Kennedy Voted to Allow Internet Providers To Sell Your Internet Browsing History

Scalise, Cassidy and Kennedy Voted to Allow Internet Providers To Sell Your Internet Browsing History

Supports say that Facebook and Google collect data on users and we allow them. the fact is that those companies only collect the data you submit, they don’t have the same information about you that internet providers like Charter or AT&T require to open an account or know what you do online, only what you do on their website. The user choose to use their websites but has no chose to use a internet providers to gain access to the internet. It’s the same if you phone service provider collected all your Texts, Calls and Address book and sold to anyone willing to buy!

Allows ISPs to collect personal data without permission

(Posted by Taylor Hatmaker) Less than a week after the Senate voted to empower internet service providers to freely share private user data with advertisers, the House has weighed in, too.

Today in a 215-205 vote on Senate Joint Resolution 34 (H. Res. 230), the House voted to repeal broadband privacy regulations that the Obama administration’s FCC introduced in 2016. In a narrower vote than some expected, 15 Republicans broke rank to join the 190 Democrats who voted against the repeal. The FCC rules, designed to protect consumers, required ISPs to seek consent from their customers in order to share their sensitive private data (it’s worth noting that ISPs can collect it, either way). For consumers, the rollback is a bad deal no matter how you slice it.

As the issue took the floor, California Representative Anna Eshoo laid into the bill, suggesting that her Republican counterparts in the House lacked a nuanced understanding of how internet providers like Comcast and Time Warner serve a different role for consumers than the optional platforms provided by companies like Google and Facebook.

“They can use your information and sell it to the highest bidder,” Eshoo argued. “I think it’s a sad day if the bill passes.”

Colorado Representative Jared Polis joined the chorus of objections on the House floor, elaborating on how limited consumers are with regard to ISPs. “This resolution undermines fundamental privacy for every internet user,” Polis said. “With a broadband provider, most of us don’t have a choice. You either sign up for your local provider or you don’t.”

Under the regulation rollback, there are few limits on the ways ISPs will be allowed to interact with sensitive user data. That includes not just allowing providers to create marketing profiles based on the browsing history of their users, but also letting them deploy undetectable tools that track web traffic, too.

There’s no doubt that major ISPs will sell out their users to advertisers when given the chance, but some smaller providers aren’t yet complicit. Still, in many markets, consumers don’t have a choice of internet provider — a problem that stands to deepen in our present climate of deregulation. Now, only a signature from the president stands in the way of the repeal.

Today’s vote is a blow to anyone who’d prefer not to put their browsing history on blast, and a major victory for advertisers hungry for all of the de-anonymized personal data that they can vacuum up and dole out. With Congress and the FCC squarely in the latter’s camp, consumers who value privacy — and really, we all should — are in for a rough ride.

The language of the joint resolution is as follows:

This joint resolution nullifies the rule submitted by the Federal Communications Commission entitled “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services.” The rule published on December 2, 2016: (1) applies the customer privacy requirements of the Communications Act of 1934 to broadband Internet access service and other telecommunications services, (2) requires telecommunications carriers to inform customers about rights to opt in or opt out of the use or the sharing of their confidential information, (3) adopts data security and breach notification requirements, (4) prohibits broadband service offerings that are contingent on surrendering privacy rights, and (5) requires disclosures and affirmative consent when a broadband provider offers customers financial incentives in exchange for the provider’s right to use a customer’s confidential information.

Shown Here: Public Law No: 115-22 (04/03/2017)

[115th Congress Public Law 22]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]

[[Page 131 STAT. 88]]

Public Law 115-22
115th Congress

                            Joint Resolution
 
  Providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5, 
United States Code, of the rule submitted by the Federal Communications 
    Commission relating to ``Protecting the Privacy of Customers of 
   Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services''. <<NOTE: Apr. 3, 
                        2017 -  [S.J. Res. 34]>> 

    Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, That Congress disapproves the 
rule submitted by the Federal Communications Commission relating to 
``Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other 
Telecommunications Services'' (81 Fed. Reg. 87274 (December 2, 2016)), 
and such rule shall have no force or effect.

    Approved April 3, 2017.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY--S.J. Res. 34:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, Vol. 163 (2017):
            Mar. 22, 23, considered and passed Senate.
            Mar. 28, considered and passed House.

Vote Summary

Question: On the Joint Resolution (S.J. Res. 34 )
Vote Number: 94
Vote Date: March 23, 2017, 12:25 PM
Required For Majority: 1/2
Vote Result: Joint Resolution Passed
Vote Counts:
YEAs: 50
NAYs: 48
Not Voting: 2

*Information compiled through Senate LIS by the Senate Bill Clerk under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate

Grouped by Home State

Alabama:
Shelby (R-AL), Yea
Strange (R-AL), Yea
Alaska:
Murkowski (R-AK), Yea
Sullivan (R-AK), Yea
Arizona:
Flake (R-AZ), Yea
McCain (R-AZ), Yea
Arkansas:
Boozman (R-AR), Yea
Cotton (R-AR), Yea
California:
Feinstein (D-CA), Nay
Harris (D-CA), Nay
Colorado:
Bennet (D-CO), Nay
Gardner (R-CO), Yea
Connecticut:
Blumenthal (D-CT), Nay
Murphy (D-CT), Nay
Delaware:
Carper (D-DE), Nay
Coons (D-DE), Nay
Florida:
Nelson (D-FL), Nay
Rubio (R-FL), Yea
Georgia:
Isakson (R-GA), Not Voting
Perdue (R-GA), Yea
Hawaii:
Hirono (D-HI), Nay
Schatz (D-HI), Nay
Idaho:
Crapo (R-ID), Yea
Risch (R-ID), Yea
Illinois:
Duckworth (D-IL), Nay
Durbin (D-IL), Nay
Indiana:
Donnelly (D-IN), Nay
Young (R-IN), Yea
Iowa:
Ernst (R-IA), Yea
Grassley (R-IA), Yea
Kansas:
Moran (R-KS), Yea
Roberts (R-KS), Yea
Kentucky:
McConnell (R-KY), Yea
Paul (R-KY), Not Voting  
Louisiana:
Cassidy (R-LA), Yea
Kennedy (R-LA), Yea
Maine:
Collins (R-ME), Yea
King (I-ME), Nay
Maryland:
Cardin (D-MD), Nay
Van Hollen (D-MD), Nay
Massachusetts:
Markey (D-MA), Nay
Warren (D-MA), Nay
Michigan:
Peters (D-MI), Nay
Stabenow (D-MI), Nay
Minnesota:
Franken (D-MN), Nay
Klobuchar (D-MN), Nay
Mississippi:
Cochran (R-MS), Yea
Wicker (R-MS), Yea
Missouri:
Blunt (R-MO), Yea
McCaskill (D-MO), Nay
Montana:
Daines (R-MT), Yea
Tester (D-MT), Nay
Nebraska:
Fischer (R-NE), Yea
Sasse (R-NE), Yea
Nevada:
Cortez Masto (D-NV), Nay
Heller (R-NV), Yea
New Hampshire:
Hassan (D-NH), Nay
Shaheen (D-NH), Nay
New Jersey:
Booker (D-NJ), Nay
Menendez (D-NJ), Nay
New Mexico:
Heinrich (D-NM), Nay
Udall (D-NM), Nay
New York:
Gillibrand (D-NY), Nay
Schumer (D-NY), Nay
North Carolina:
Burr (R-NC), Yea
Tillis (R-NC), Yea  
North Dakota:
Heitkamp (D-ND), Nay
Hoeven (R-ND), Yea
Ohio:
Brown (D-OH), Nay
Portman (R-OH), Yea
Oklahoma:
Inhofe (R-OK), Yea
Lankford (R-OK), Yea
Oregon:
Merkley (D-OR), Nay
Wyden (D-OR), Nay
Pennsylvania:
Casey (D-PA), Nay
Toomey (R-PA), Yea
Rhode Island:
Reed (D-RI), Nay
Whitehouse (D-RI), Nay
South Carolina:
Graham (R-SC), Yea
Scott (R-SC), Yea
South Dakota:
Rounds (R-SD), Yea
Thune (R-SD), Yea
Tennessee:
Alexander (R-TN), Yea
Corker (R-TN), Yea
Texas:
Cornyn (R-TX), Yea
Cruz (R-TX), Yea
Utah:
Hatch (R-UT), Yea
Lee (R-UT), Yea
Vermont:
Leahy (D-VT), Nay
Sanders (I-VT), Nay
Virginia:
Kaine (D-VA), Nay
Warner (D-VA), Nay
Washington:
Cantwell (D-WA), Nay
Murray (D-WA), Nay
West Virginia:
Capito (R-WV), Yea
Manchin (D-WV), Nay
Wisconsin:
Baldwin (D-WI), Nay
Johnson (R-WI), Yea
Wyoming:
Barrasso (R-WY), Yea
Enzi (R-WY), Yea

 

 

FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 202
(Republicans in roman; Democrats in italic; Independents underlined)

S J RES 34      YEA-AND-NAY      28-Mar-2017      5:56 PM
QUESTION:  On Passage
BILL TITLE: Providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of the rule submitted by the Federal Communications Commission relating to “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services”

 

YEAS NAYS PRES NV
REPUBLICAN 215 15 6
DEMOCRATIC 190 3
INDEPENDENT
TOTALS 215 205   9

 

—- YEAS    215 —
 

Abraham
Aderholt
Allen
Amodei
Arrington
Babin
Bacon
Banks (IN)
Barletta
Barr
Barton
Bergman
Biggs
Bilirakis
Bishop (MI)
Bishop (UT)
Black
Blackburn
Blum
Bost
Brady (TX)
Brat
Bridenstine
Brooks (IN)
Buchanan
Buck
Bucshon
Budd
Burgess
Byrne
Calvert
Carter (GA)
Carter (TX)
Chabot
Chaffetz
Cheney
Cole
Collins (GA)
Collins (NY)
Comer
Comstock
Conaway
Cook
Costello (PA)
Cramer
Crawford
Culberson
Curbelo (FL)
Davis, Rodney
Denham
Dent
DeSantis
DesJarlais
Diaz-Balart
Donovan
Duncan (SC)
Dunn
Emmer
Farenthold
Ferguson
Fitzpatrick
Fleischmann
Flores
Fortenberry
Foxx
Franks (AZ)
Frelinghuysen
Gaetz
Gallagher
Garrett
Gibbs
Gohmert
Goodlatte
Gosar
Gowdy
Granger
Graves (GA)
Graves (MO)
Griffith
Grothman
Guthrie
Harper
Harris
Hartzler
Hensarling
Hice, Jody B.
Higgins (LA)
Holding
Hollingsworth
Hudson
Huizenga
Hultgren
Hunter
Hurd
Issa
Jenkins (KS)
Jenkins (WV)
Johnson (LA)
Johnson (OH)
Johnson, Sam
Jordan
Joyce (OH)
Katko
Kelly (MS)
Kelly (PA)
King (IA)
King (NY)
Kinzinger
Knight
Kustoff (TN)
Labrador
LaHood
LaMalfa
Lamborn
Lance
Latta
Lewis (MN)
LoBiondo
Long
Loudermilk
Love
Lucas
Luetkemeyer
MacArthur
Marchant
Marshall
Massie
Mast
McCarthy
McCaul
McHenry
McKinley
McMorris Rodgers
McSally
Meadows
Meehan
Messer
Mitchell
Moolenaar
Mooney (WV)
Mullin
Murphy (PA)
Newhouse
Noem
Nunes
Olson
Palazzo
Palmer
Paulsen
Pearce
Perry
Poe (TX)
Poliquin
Posey
Ratcliffe
Reed
Renacci
Rice (SC)
Roby
Roe (TN)
Rogers (AL)
Rogers (KY)
Rohrabacher
Rokita
Rooney, Francis
Rooney, Thomas J.
Roskam
Ross
Rothfus
Rouzer
Royce (CA)
Russell
Rutherford
Scalise
Schweikert
Scott, Austin
Sensenbrenner
Sessions
Shimkus
Shuster
Smith (MO)
Smith (NE)
Smith (NJ)
Smith (TX)
Smucker
Stewart
Stivers
Taylor
Tenney
Thompson (PA)
Thornberry
Tiberi
Tipton
Trott
Turner
Upton
Valadao
Wagner
Walberg
Walden
Walker
Walorski
Walters, Mimi
Weber (TX)
Webster (FL)
Wenstrup
Westerman
Williams
Wilson (SC)
Wittman
Womack
Woodall
Yoho
Young (AK)
Young (IA)

 

—- NAYS    205 —
 

Adams
Aguilar
Amash
Barragán
Bass
Beatty
Bera
Beyer
Bishop (GA)
Blumenauer
Blunt Rochester
Bonamici
Boyle, Brendan F.
Brady (PA)
Brooks (AL)
Brown (MD)
Brownley (CA)
Bustos
Butterfield
Capuano
Carbajal
Cárdenas
Carson (IN)
Cartwright
Castor (FL)
Castro (TX)
Chu, Judy
Cicilline
Clark (MA)
Clarke (NY)
Clay
Cleaver
Clyburn
Coffman
Cohen
Connolly
Conyers
Cooper
Correa
Costa
Courtney
Crist
Crowley
Cuellar
Cummings
Davidson
Davis (CA)
Davis, Danny
DeFazio
DeGette
Delaney
DeLauro
DelBene
Demings
DeSaulnier
Deutch
Dingell
Doggett
Doyle, Michael F.
Duncan (TN)
Ellison
Engel
Eshoo
Espaillat
Esty
Evans
Faso
Foster
Frankel (FL)
Fudge
Gabbard
Gallego
Garamendi
Gonzalez (TX)
Gottheimer
Graves (LA)
Green, Al
Green, Gene
Grijalva
Gutiérrez
Hanabusa
Hastings
Heck
Herrera Beutler
Higgins (NY)
Himes
Hoyer
Huffman
Jackson Lee
Jayapal
Jeffries
Johnson (GA)
Johnson, E. B.
Jones
Kaptur
Keating
Kelly (IL)
Kennedy
Khanna
Kihuen
Kildee
Kilmer
Kind
Krishnamoorthi
Kuster (NH)
Langevin
Larsen (WA)
Larson (CT)
Lawrence
Lawson (FL)
Lee
Levin
Lewis (GA)
Lieu, Ted
Lipinski
Loebsack
Lofgren
Lowenthal
Lowey
Lujan Grisham, M.
Luján, Ben Ray
Lynch
Maloney, Carolyn B.
Maloney, Sean
Matsui
McClintock
McCollum
McEachin
McGovern
McNerney
Meeks
Meng
Moore
Moulton
Murphy (FL)
Nadler
Napolitano
Neal
Nolan
Norcross
O’Halleran
O’Rourke
Pallone
Panetta
Pascrell
Payne
Pelosi
Perlmutter
Peters
Peterson
Pingree
Pocan
Polis
Price (NC)
Quigley
Raskin
Reichert
Rice (NY)
Richmond
Rosen
Roybal-Allard
Ruiz
Ruppersberger
Ryan (OH)
Sánchez
Sanford
Sarbanes
Schakowsky
Schiff
Schneider
Schrader
Scott (VA)
Scott, David
Serrano
Sewell (AL)
Shea-Porter
Sherman
Sinema
Sires
Smith (WA)
Soto
Speier
Stefanik
Suozzi
Swalwell (CA)
Takano
Thompson (CA)
Thompson (MS)
Titus
Torres
Tsongas
Vargas
Veasey
Vela
Velázquez
Visclosky
Walz
Wasserman Schultz
Waters, Maxine
Watson Coleman
Welch
Wilson (FL)
Yarmuth
Yoder
Zeldin

—- NOT VOTING    9 —
 

Duffy
Hill
Marino
Pittenger
Ros-Lehtinen
Rush
Simpson
Slaughter
Tonko

 

 

SOURCE: Allows ISPs to collect personal data without permission (Posted by Taylor Hatmaker)

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